Monthly Archives: May 2014

Highest of the Whole Foods

The Whole Foods that opened in Frisco during May has the distinction of being highest in the chain of 387 stores. It also has snowboards for signs and other distinctive elements. And Frisco expects to get $950,000 per year in added sales tax revenue. Continue reading

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Denver’s Union Station milestone

Opening of the new bus concourse at Denver’s Union Station was a milestone, but even more significant will be the launch of commuter rail trains in 2016. Continue reading

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Breaking and mending at Mountainfilm in Telluride 2014

Breaking and mending were among the themes this year of Mountainfilm in Telluride, with a broken agriculture system and broken men among those things that need mending. But another theme was about partnerships and harmony. Continue reading

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Putting water to work

And now come new efforts across Colorado to further yoke the power of falling water. Continue reading

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Mountainfilm focuses on Wilderness Act

Fifty years ago, the U.S. Congress passed the landmark Wilderness Act of 1964. With authors Douglas Brinkley, Cheryl Strayed, and Jared Diamond to lend perspective, Mountainfilm in Telluride this year will devote its opening session around the question of what does wilderness mean collectively and individually. Continue reading

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Big water savings in Aspen

Aspen in 1974 was seeing the need for massive expansion of water storage and treatment to accommodate population growth. Instead, it set out on a different course, one of conservation and efficiency. Per-capital use has declined from 516 gallons to 164 gallons during the last two decades. Continue reading

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Creating a new water normal in mountain towns

Breckenridge is among Colorado’s mountain towns looking to take measures to encourage more efficient use of water for outdoor lawn irrigation. “We have to walk the talk,” says Tim Gagen, the town manager. “We can’t just sit up here and say we have all the water, now we’ll use it.”

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Tilting the table of Colorado’s water geography

Transmountain diversions from Colorado’s Western Slope to cities and farms east of the Continental Divide range from 450,000 to 600,000 acre-feet a year
Exactly how much water is that? Continue reading

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Should government be able limit the size of your lawn?

It’s hard to say what proportion of a typical residential lot is covered by water-intensive turf. One guess is 40 to 60 percent after the house, sidewalks, and so forth are subtracted. A much more Draconian limit of 15 percent was proposed in a bill introduced into the Colorado legislature this year. This summer, an interim committee will discuss whether the state should adopt measures to limit water use for urban development and leave it for agriculture use. Continue reading

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Changing of the guard in Eagle

Eagle, located along I-70 halfway between Vail and Glenwood Springs, has a trio of new town trustees this spring, all of them in their 40s, relatively new to Eagle, and convinced of Eagle’s worthiness as a destination, and not just a bedroom community =to the Vail Valley.
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